Should You Use Fingering Yarn for That Project?

Deciding on the right weight of yarn can be more difficult than it seems. Specific patterns will state what weight of yarn to use, but if you haven’t picked out a pattern yet, you can decide on the yarn weight before looking at patterns. When you’re deciding whether to use fingering weight or something else for a project, there are a few things to consider.

The Type of Project

Some projects more frequently use a certain weight of yarn. Sweaters, for instance, are generally made from worsted weight yarn. Socks are commonly made from fingering weight. The type of project could dictate what weight to purchase, though there are always exceptions and it may be possible to find a pattern that uses a different weight if that’s your preference.

The Bulk Preferred

How bulky should the finished project be? Hats can be thin or bulky, depending on the desired look. Socks are generally thin but can be bulky if they’re to be used with work boots or as house socks. Sweaters are generally bulky, but they can be made with thinner yarn for a lightweight option when it’s chilly outside.

Warmth Needed

Choosing the right type of yarn can make a big difference in how warm the finished project will be, but the yarn weight can have an impact as well. If you’re looking for very warm socks to wear around the house in winter, worsted weight wool might be the better option. If you would prefer a thin sweater so it doesn’t get too warm when you wear it in the office, choosing a lighter-weight yarn might be a better idea.

Wear and Tear

Thicker yarns tend to handle the wear and tear better, but there are exceptions to this as well. Yarns that include at least some acrylics are going to be harder wearing and will last longer than fully natural yarns, so keep that in mind as well. For projects like blankets, this may be desired, as they are likely to be cherished and passed down over generations. The goal is to have them hold up as long as possible without needing repair.

Quick or not?

Even for the smallest of projects, projects using thicker yarns are going to be completed a lot faster. With larger projects like blankets or sweaters, this could mean saving hours of work to finish the project. However, if there is no time limit and the goal is to have a gorgeous project at the end, then thinner yarn may work fine. Just be aware that because the yarn is thinner, the project will take longer to finish.

If you’re looking for a new knitting or crochet project, consider the weight of the yarn carefully. A variety of weights can be used for just about any type of project, from fingering yarn to worsted or bulky, depending on what you desire. Use the above points to think about what characteristics you want the final project to include so you can pick out the right yarn and pattern to meet your needs.